Code and Arc Flash

801 NEC Revisions – 1 Day
802 NEC National Electrical Code® – 3 Days
805 NESC National Electrical Safety Code
806 National Electrical Safety Code – 8 Hours
809 NFPA 70E
810 Arc/Flash Analysis & Mitigation
810A Arc/Flash Analysis & Mitigation Overview for Electrical Utility Management
810B Arc/Flash Analysis & Mitigation Arc Flash Estimating for Utility (GT&D) Workers
810C Arc/Flash Analysis & Mitigation Industrial – NFPA® & IEEE Specific

NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE®
1 DAY CLASS Update
Course 801

The 1-day seminar on the current NEC® is an update for staff already proficient in the applications of the National Electrical Code®.

This seminar addresses code changes that impact in industrial facilities. Proficiency with the current NEC® is required for safety officers, quality assurance, inspectors, electrical engineers, designers, draftsmen, contractors, electricians, maintenance technicians and estimators. OSHA (CFR 1910.332) mandates employees to be trained in and familiar with electrical safety-related work practices.

This course requires prior proficiency with the National Electrical Code®. Course outline modified on cycle to meet current code changes and requirements.

Contact us at info@atc-trng.com for outlines and additional information on this and other courses. All of our courses can be adapted to meet a client’s specific need.

NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE® –
3 DAY
Course 802

This NEC® training course is structured to analyze and interpret the most prevalent, misunderstood and commonly used articles of the National Electrical Code®. NEC® tables are examined and sample problems structured to enhance the participant’s skills in the applications of NEC® tables.

Course material emphasizing industrial applications dominates this presentation. Course objective is to afford participants the opportunity to enhance their working knowledge of the NEC® and increase code compliance.

Typical participants are Electrical Engineers, Safety Engineers, Project Managers, Inspectors, Contractors Master and Journeymen electricians who depend on effective skills and code knowledge. Participants must bring a calculator to the course. Course material is modified on the same cycle as the NEC Code reflecting current information.

Course is designed to last three days but may be modified to meet client needs.

Contact us at info@atc-trng.com for outlines and additional information on this and other courses. All of our courses can be adapted to meet a client’s specific need.

National Electrical Safety Code®
Course 805

The National Electrical Safety Code® is a complex document applicable to the safeguarding of persons from hazards associated with the transmission and distribution of electrical energy including industrial sites similar to electric supply systems. Revised on a five year cycle this course is updated to coincide to the most recently published version.

Adopted by most states and territories this is the generally accepted document most often used in the courtroom. An employees failure to properly interpret and properly apply the code can cost an owner enormous amounts of money.

Divided into four parts it covers substations (areas restricted to qualified personnel) clearances, underground systems and work practices. Part four contains work rules used by OSHA as a reference to write standards such as 1910.269. This seminar is an instructor led workshop, designed to familiarize an individual with the correct use and interpretation of this document. Participants during the course research, answer and discuss more than 250 questions pertaining directly to the correct interpretation and application of the NESC®.

Upon completion the individual will be able to use the Code in the normal design, operation, maintenance and construction of electrical supply facilities. Engineers and administrators benefit from this in depth analysis of the NESC® and its application to electric supply systems

Contact us at info@atc-trng.com for outlines and additional information on this and other courses. All of our courses can be adapted to meet a client’s specific need.

NATIONAL ELECTRICAL SAFETY CODE®
One (1) Day Revision Update Course
Course 806

Participants attending this course are assumed to be familiar and periodically apply the code to various applications.

This eight (8) hour presentation of the National Electrical Safety Code® summarizes electric utilities’ responsibilities under the most current Code revision. Changes in code requirements for the protection of the public and electrical workers as required by the Code are explained. Code purpose, intent and changes in the latest code revision are summarized.

Both management’s and the individual’s responsibilities are explained in a direct and effective manner. Participants completing this seminar will be current with all changes as they exist in the current code.

Successful participants understand the purpose and intent of the code and will identify it as a reference document for safely operating and maintaining an electrical utility system.

Contact us at info@atc-trng.com for outlines and additional information on this and other courses. All of our courses can be adapted to meet a client’s specific need.

NFPA 70E
Course 809

Combining a unique computer presentation with NFPA 70E illustrations, this course provides the student with a graphical understanding of the requirements of NFPA 70E. Updated on the same cycle as 70E participants always get the latest information.

OSHA 1910.339 defines qualified workers as “One familiar with the construction and operation of the equipment and the hazards involved.” OSHA 1910.269 states “Qualified employees shall also be trained and competent in: (D) The proper use of the special precautionary techniques, personal protective equipment, insulating and shielding materials, and insulated tools for working on or near exposed energized parts of electric equipment.” Additionally, beginning with 2002 edition the NEC, Article 110.16 has required equipment to be “field marked to warn qualified persons of potential electric arc flash hazards.”

As a result all qualified electrical workers, both utility and industrial, must be able to identify the hazard, estimate the magnitude of the hazard and implement positive actions to mitigate losses and reduce or control the arc & flash hazard. NFPA 70E and IEEE 1584 both address this issue.

This course combines a unique computer presentation with exercises to provide the student a graphical understanding of the requirements of both NFPA 70E 2000 and the new IEEE Standard 1584 – 2002. Techniques used to identify, estimate, control the arc & flash hazard and selecting appropriate personal protective equipment are emphasized. Special attention is given to hazard identification, marking, safety related work practices, and procedures for conducting Electrical Hazard and Arc Flash Hazard analysis. Software and formulas will be provided to calculate values. This course is especially offered for qualified electrical (utility and industrial) workers including their supervisors, managers, safety professionals, and engineers. Classroom exercises and case studies reinforce the students’ understanding of the application of these standards. Students are encouraged to bring their one line drawings and transformer name plate data to class. There are no prerequisites for this course.

EQUIPMENT: Students must bring a calculator to class. Students are encouraged to bring a laptop computer. Note: A laptop is not required to successfully complete this course.

Contact us at info@atc-trng.com for outlines and additional information on this and other courses. All of our courses can be adapted to meet a client’s specific need.

Arc/Flash Analysis & Mitigation
Course 810

This course addresses both legal and humane issues resulting from the increased hazards of electrical arcs and flashes. OSHA, Generally Accepted Industry Standards, and selected applicable papers are explained in detail. System fault current and coordination studies are required to properly determine hazard magnitude; consequently qualified engineers must be involved in any analysis. Workers exposed to these hazards must have sufficient knowledge to understand hazard, hazard magnitude and the ability to follow appropriate work practices completely. Currently the electrical industry and OSHA have not determined a “best method” of determining arc/flash hazard magnitude and five (5) different methods exist for calculating the hazard, in calories /centimeter or burn index. This course compares each method and explains each methods origin and limitations. Alternatives to requiring workers to wear massive layers of protective clothing are covered. Participants are made aware of the fragility of human bodies relative to the hazard resulting from phenomenal increases in system fault currents.

Participants completing this course will have a firm understanding of the arc/flash hazard, how it has grown, and what they can do to control this increasing problem and meet their legal and moral obligations to workers.

Contact us at info@atc-trng.com for outlines and additional information on this and other courses. All of our courses can be adapted to meet a client’s specific need.

Arc/Flash Analysis & Mitigation
Overview for Electrical Utility Management
Course 810A

Arc Flash was publicly recognized in 1980 as a serious electrical hazard in industrial plants by Ralph Lee of DuPont. In 1990 OSHA began utilizing NFPA® 70E as a guide to mitigate industrial arc/flash injuries. In 2002 IEEE Standard 1584 was published addressing the Arc Flash Hazard. IEEE 1584 is essentially a reproduced NFPA® 70E document that defaults to Ralph Lee methodology for voltages above 1000 volts. Neither document is based on task typically performed by workers directly engaged in the generation, transmission, or distribution (GT&D) of electric energy.

WHY ATTEND: Effective January 2009 the NESC® requires electric supply organizations to address arc/flash hazards for workers engaged in GT&D work. This course addresses legal and humane issues (What, Why & When) resulting from electrical arc and flash injuries to GT&D (electric supply utility) workers.

OSHA, NESC®, NFPA® 70E, ASTM Standards, and selected applicable papers are explained. Managers, Supervisors, of workers exposed to arc/flash must have sufficient knowledge to understand hazard, hazard magnitude and possess the ability to ascertain if workers are following appropriate work practices. Management must also possess knowledge sufficient to prevent costly judgment errors when selecting hazard estimate and mitigation methodologies and or PPE. Currently the electrical industry and OSHA have not determined a “best method” of determining arc/flash hazard magnitude and five (5) methods exist for calculating the hazard, in calories /centimeter or burn index. Participants completing this course gain a basic understanding of the arc/flash hazard, how it has grown, and what management can do to control this increasing problem and meet their legal and moral obligations to workers.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: This course is designed to provide GT&D (electric supply) Managers, Supervisors, and Safety Professionals a fundamental (What, Why & When) understanding of the hazard, applicable standards, mitigation methods, and techniques. It is an introductory course for Senior Engineers and Engineers performing arc/flash hazard analysis, calculations or selecting mitigation methods.

Contact us at info@atc-trng.com for outlines and additional information on this and other courses. All of our courses can be adapted to meet a client’s specific need.

Arc/Flash Analysis & Mitigation
Arc Flash Estimating for Utility (GT&D) Workers
Course 810B

This course is an in-depth version of “Arc/Flash Analysis & Mitigation – Overview for Electrical Utility Management” addressing methodologies and calculations for electrical arc and flash scenarios specific to workers covered by OSHA 1910.269. Data used in developing IEEE Standard 1584, NFPA® 70E is primarily based on three phase arcs on low voltage systems (V<1000v) and is less applicable for utility workers working on medium and high voltage systems (V>1000v). GT&D electric systems have larger clearances and reduced probability of multi phase arcs, however, longer single phase arcs at high voltages demand additional attention and study to assure proper hazard analysis.

WHY ATTEND: Effective January 2009 the NESC® requires electric supply organizations to address arc/flash hazards for workers engaged in GT&D work. Alternative measures to excessive layers of PPE that meet OSHA, NESC®, NFPA® 70E, ASTM Standards are discussed. Lead engineers and others required to estimate hazard magnitude and determine appropriate protective measures will find this course very beneficial.

Currently the electrical industry and OSHA have not determined a “best method” of determining arc/flash hazard magnitude and five (5) methods exist for calculating the hazard, in calories /centimeter or burn index. Each of the five methods are explained, example calculations are performed in the class room and compared. Appropriate ASTM Standards addressing testing and selection of FR rated PPE are discussed. This course enables an individual to make reasonable and prudent decisions concerning arc/flash methods, calculations, and protection by providing the background information required to substantiate their decisions and recommendations.

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Lead Engineers and Safety Professionals desiring to learn methods specific to protecting workers directly engaged in the generation, transmission, or distribution (GT&D) of electric energy find this course beneficial. GT&D Overhead and Underground worker tasks and work positions (poles, manholes, cubicles, and vaults) are discussed, analyzed, and modeled.

Contact us at info@atc-trng.com for outlines and additional information on this and other courses. All of our courses can be adapted to meet a client’s specific need.

Arc/Flash Analysis & Mitigation
Industrial – NFPA® & IEEE Specific
Course 810C

OSHA Sub Part “S” and NFPA® 70E require the electric industry to perform an arc/flash analysis and to implement a hazard mitigation program. Sub Part “S” revised and published in August 2007 is a ruling document for all electrical work outside of GT&D systems. This course provides managers, supervisors, engineers, and workers sufficient information to meet the arc flash requirements of these documents and to implement a safe work environment.

WHY ATTEND: This course begins with a historical overview of electrical system changes that have forced arc flash hazard analysis and mitigation to the industry forefront. A detailed PPT presentation explains fault currents, coordination, heat transfer and mitigation methods sufficient for a qualified person to perform their own arc/flash analysis in an industrial complex. The course presentation combines a unique computer presentation with illustrations providing the student with a graphical understanding of OSHA and NFPA® 70E requirements. Special attention is given to the Safety Related Work Practices section of this standard which includes the procedures for conducting electrical hazard and arc flash hazard analysis. Excel spread sheets and IEEE 1584 formulas will be provided to calculate values. Classroom exercises and case studies reinforce the students’ understanding of the application of these standards. There are no prerequisites for this course. Emphasis is placed on low voltage systems (V<1000volts).

WHO SHOULD ATTEND: Managers, safety supervisors, and safety professionals responsible for electrical safety programs, procedure implementation, and management gain the knowledge required to successfully administer arc/flash programs. Workers learn to appreciate the hazard and how to use and maintain PPE, select work procedures and PPE for maximum protection. Engineers and analyst learn to apply NFPA® & IEEE calculations and arc/flash hazard mitigation.

Contact us at info@atc-trng.com for outlines and additional information on this and other courses. All of our courses can be adapted to meet a client’s specific need.